Category Archives: SOUTHERN JOURNAL

I decided to focus on religion as we drove across the southern United States

A Tale Of Two Stairways

Past, Present, Faulkner

    By LARRY CALLOWAY (C) “My fellow citizens,” Abraham Lincoln said, addressing Congress in December 1863. “We cannot escape history.” The sentiment and, “The past never dies. It is not even past,”  a line from William Faulkner that has been elevated by quote pickers to the status of an aphorism about the South, hummed […]

HILLBILLY SYNCHRONICITY

My Fellow Americans. . .

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By Larry Joseph Calloway ©  The networks were so unprepared for Donald Trump’s win that my election night switching caught only one panelist who could speak with authority for the key voters euphemistically called “white – no college degree.”  He was J. D. Vance, the black-haired concise-speaking author of “Hillbilly Elegy,” an immediately personal story […]

The Grass and God in America

Part 1, New Mexico and Oklahoma

  (IN SEVEN PARTS ) By LARRY JOSEPH CALLOWAY As we, Patricia and I, began our drive in a Murano loaded with camping gear on a southern route from Crestone to Washington D.C. we established an informal division of blog labor, a reversal of occupational roles. She would be the journalist. I would be the […]

A Hunger In The Land

Part Two, Oklahoma and The Cherokee Nation

At a restaurant called EAT in neon letters three feet high I ordered chicken fried steak and gravy, which is the essence of the official Oklahoma State Meal, created by the legislature in 1988 to promote beef and other agricultural derivatives including corn bread and pecan pie. EAT was crowded, and many of the noon […]

The Music Everybody Knows

Part 3, The Ozarks and New Orleans

Because much of the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas is federal, all the campgrounds were closed, so we found ourselves checking-in at the Dogwood Motel in Mountainview (pop. c. 3000). The young man at the desk recommended a catfish restaurant and the Ozark Culture Center north of town. Catfish needs no definition. Even anthropologists argue endlessly […]

Going In Peace

Part 4, the Natchez Trace

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Thich Nhat Hanh teaches walking meditation. Early one morning in Hanoi he took a long line of us walking — slow and mindful, step by step, breath by breath — against the rush-hour torrent of 125 cc motor scooters, as government agents, no doubt, watched.  I am wondering how walking meditation would go over in […]

Family In A Perfect World

Part 5, A North Carolina Holler

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Appalachian “hollers” (hollows) are perfect little worlds, or used to be. They provided everything a large family needed: timber, firewood and game from the surrounding mountains, grazing on the descending  slopes, farming in the fertile bottom lands, and even fish in the streams. And in almost every holler was a church and a cemetery next […]

Free At Last In Washington

Part 6, the capitol grounds

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  In a time of militant religiosity, when “God Bless America” is the standard ending of most political speeches, it was encouraging to visit the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial, Washington’s newest. There is no “God” in the 14 quotations approved by his family to be cut in white stone.  How do you explain a […]

Why I Love Black Walnuts

First Posted June 2006

When I was a boy one of my father’s sisters gave him a tree, a sapling, and we planted it in the back yard in Denver. He said it was a black walnut from the mountains of western North Carolina, which are practically owned by the Scotch-Irish, his people. That gnarly stick of a tree […]