Author Archives: ljcalloway

About ljcalloway

I am a writer. I love the Rocky Mountain West. For more than 50 years my primary residence has been in the upper basin of the Rio Grande.

Recognizing The Gentleman From America

My Thoughts Induced by "Hemingway"

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I RECALL Professor Charles Nilon, teaching a class in modern novels at Boulder, identified Ernest Hemingway as “an American gentleman.” The memory surfaced as I watched the first episode of the Ken Burns documentary on PBS. Like a British noble, Hemingway toured the colonies, hunted trophy animals, behaved well in military combat, was a sportsman […]

How To Tell A Fake Human

Review of the new novel by Kazuo Ishiguro

“Klara And The Sun” by Kazuo Ishiguro is a tale told by a robot living — if that is the right word — in an AI-governed dystopia  where automatons imitate humans and ambitious parents submit their children to “genetic editing” for success in the vicious meritocracy. She (Klara) is an “AF” (artificial friend) bought like […]

Rare Variant Hits BV Prison

First Appearance Of South African Mutation

BECAUSE the dangerous South African variant of covid 19 has somehow infected two staffers and one inmate at the Buena Vista Correctional Center, mass testing and vaccination began at the medium security prison this week. The three infections, discovered by random screening of positive test results, were the first signs that the mutation had reached […]

Mid February’s Cold Numbers

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  THE NATIONAL COVID DEATH TOLL has been tracked mathematically since March by Bill Miller of Crestone. His graph as we approached mid January shows the beginning of a fourth deviation, representing the beginning of a possible new peak. Two weeks earlier he changed the axes of the graph to make the projection easier to see. […]

Getting Jabbed In The County Seat

Among Thoughts Of Confederacy

THE VACCINES are federal but the vaccinations are local. I was wondering how the two levels of government were meshing as I began to roll across the San Luis Valley to the community center in Saguache to get the first of my covid jabs, as the Brits call them. (We call them shots, but that […]

Excoriation Nation

Let me blog a minute. . .

Dr. Myra Ellen Jenkins would be happy she is not alive now. There is such a thing as living too long. I wrote in the 1980’s about her involvement as New Mexico state historian in the first controversy over the historic obelisk in the center of the Santa Fe Plaza. It was all about a […]

A Thick Description Of A Deep Time

¡JUSTICIA! By Federico Antonio Reade (Albuquerque, 309 pages)

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A UNM UNDERGRADUATE  named Federico Antonio Reade called me in Santa Fe in the fall of 1980 asking to record  my recollections of the Rio Arriba County Court House Raid — a northern New Mexico rebellion that already was fading beneath a wash of scholarly interpretation. I had been the only journalist (and the only […]

Not Everything Trump Says Is A Lie

A Philospher Made Some Classical Distinctions

IN PLACE of what print journalists refer to as President Trump’s lies, cable commenters have a less formal term. Trevor Noah of the Comedy Channel and Don Lemon and Chris Cuomo of CNN just say “bullshit.”  If that sums up Trump’s usual performances, then press briefings and most interviews are bull sessions, with consequences I […]

The Winning of the West and the Theft of Mt. Rushmore

How the Union army continued west after the Civil War. Reviews of "Lakota America" by Pekka Hamalainen and "West from Appomattox" by Heather Cox Richardson

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  Along T-shirt row in Deadwood, the gold-gulch town in South Dakota’s Black Hills, you can read silk-screened homages to bikers, gunfighters, gamblers, anti-immigrant soldiers (“If you are reading this in English, thank the U.S. military.”)  and the armed protection of private property. The town’s  history of lawless violence was the basic entertainment value of […]

MAY DAY MEDITATION

Keep Yer Distance, Pilgrim

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Experiencing extreme social distancing at home on May Day, I was reminded of something I wrote as a journalist that was never published because I could not figure out how to make it topical. It was about the first American Maypole. Thomas Morton, a relocated London barrister, planted it in 1627 on a hill aboveMassachusetts Bay. […]